Welcome to Iona PS Robotics for 2017

The Iona PS robotics program is back for 2017, with 12 excited, promising new members from Year 5 and Year 6. The “Robotic Rebels”, with several new members, are returning this year; and our new mixed Years 5-6 team, “No Signal”, voted on their team name and logo last week. Welcome aboard girls!

Forays into Mindstorms Programming

With so many new members this year, we ran separate first-year and second-year EV3 programming challenges through Term 1. After exploring the use of flowcharts in robotics programming, our first-year students worked through the Drag Race and Maze Challenges, before exploring the use of the touch and ultrasonic sensors. Apparently, it is lots of fun to drive robots at walls (IF you know how to stop!)

 

Our second-year students explored intermediate to advanced programming techniques, including displaying text on the robot’s screen, using data wires to transfer sensor information into data or maths blocks, and proportional line following techniques. Amazingly, one girl recently managed to solve the incredibly difficult line follow challenge on our robotics mat – using 2 sensor proportional line following! Once again, I’d like to thank @EV3Lessons … whose resources help make this program possible!

 

“Robots and Walls don’t Mix!”

Miele robot vacuum, IFA 2015Creative Commons License Kārlis Dambrāns via Compfight

Have you ever wondered how a robot vacuum cleaner detects and avoids obstacles? This was a question our girls sought to answer when they began exploring the role of sensors in aiding robot navigation.

The first sensor we worked with was the touch sensor, which is ‘activated’ by a ‘push’, being ‘released’, or with a ‘bump’. As the girls discovered, this sensor can be extremely useful for detecting obstacles in front of the robot.

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The first challenge required the girls to work out the difference between the ‘push’ and ‘bump’ sensor states. They had to program their robot to move forward until a team member ‘bumped’ the sensor with their hand. The resulting code looked something like this:

Screen Shot 2016-07-08 at 12.06.42 pm

Move Forward –> Wait Until Touch Sensor is ‘bumped” –> Play “Sorry” —> Move Back 1 rotation.

Robots and Walls don’t Mix!

The next challenge proved to be rather entertaining. The girls were asked to program their robot to move until it detected a wall, reverse 20cm or so, and then turn 90 degrees. Then after adding a loop, they had to create a physical obstacle course for the robot to navigate through. Judging by the number of robots trying to drive through (and climb) walls, this wasn’t an easy challenge. 🙂

The key to success relies on understanding the difference between the ‘bump’ and the ‘push’ states when using the touch sensor. A bump could be likened to a quick tap; however, the ‘push’ is activated when the sensor detects a firm pushing force (e.g. what happens when you hit a wall).

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And, in one of the funniest pre-season moments to date … 

  • Student: “Mr Graffin, our touch sensor doesn’t work! Our robot is stupid!”
  • Teammate: “Have you tried plugging it in …?”

They had to pick me up off the floor after that one, 🙂