Tournament Day! #animalallies 2016

On November 27, 2016, the Robotic Rebels and The Motherboards attended their first ever FLL robotics tournament, held at Curtin University. While it was at times an overwhelming experience for their coach, the girls really enjoyed the day – and actually did rather well. The Robotic Rebels came fourth overall in the Robot Game; and The Motherboards placed second in the Presentation category.

These are some of the photo highlights from the day. Thank you to our parents, and Rachel Barret Photography, for their generous sharing of the tournament photos.

The Robotic Rebels 

 

The Motherboards

Photo by Rachael Barrett www.facebook.com/rachaelbarrettphotography

Photo by Rachael Barrett www.facebook.com/rachaelbarrettphotography

 

 

Becoming #AnimalAllies! Our projects for #FLL 2016

In the leadup to our recent tournament, the Year 5 and 6 FLL eams were incredibly busy programming, building and testing their robots, while also working on their research projects.

As part of this year’s competition, the girls had to investigate and pose an innovative solution to a real-world problem relating to the interaction between humans and animals.  The Year 5’s sought to reduce the impact of discarded fishing line on river dolphins, while the Year 6’s sought to raise awareness and promote the better treatment of newborn calves in the dairy industry.

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Dolphin Allies

As part of their research, the Year 5s interviewed Sarah Marley, a marine biologist from Curtin University. Sarah is conducting her doctoral research on the impact of human activity on dolphins’ ability to communicate in noisy sound environments. She was able to share her experience and knowledge of the problems arising from the interactions between humans and dolphins.

We learned that:

  • When dolphins get caught in fishing line, their fins get torn off, making it hard for them to swim – Matilda.
  • To help stop dolphins getting caught in discarded fishing line in the Swan River, there are small bins placed alongside the river near popular fishing spots – Elizabeth.
  • The Maui dolphins have rounded fins – Asher.
  • Sarah, a marine biologist, is researching how dolphins communicate – Beth.
  • Dolphins can live for a very long time – Sarah M.

Drawing upon Sarah’s expertise, the Year 5 team voted to focus on the problem of dolphins being caught in discarded fishing line in the nearby Swan River. Their proposed solution was to sell and promote biodegradable fishing line, which would naturally decompose after a certain time of exposure to salt water.

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Investigating Animal Welfare in the Dairy Industry

Prior to this year’s FLL season, I knew very little about the dairy industry, except that Western Australian dairy farmers have been severely struggling financially due to milk producers being paid less than the cost of production by big dairy companies.

With the help of Jess Andony, the Young Dairy Network Coordinator at Western Dairy, the girls investigated some very emotive, complex issues in the dairy industry. We learned a great deal about the dairy industry and were surprised to learn that cows generally enjoy being milked.

The girls ultimately voted to focus on improving the Australian and international practice of separating newborn calves from their mothers shortly after birth. The calves are taken away to be slaughtered as veal. Their solution was to create a website promoting the improved treatment of newborn cows, and supporting a charity dedicated to improving the welfare of dairy cows.

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Creating the prop abbatoir

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Year 6 rehearsing their presentation

Team Building with Fun, Laughter, and Robots

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During the October school holidays, we ran our first holiday robotics workshops. Both our Year 5 and Year 6 FLL teams completed several Core Values challenges (team building activities); invested a few hours into their mission planning and programming; and chose a topic for their research projects. It was a very busy, but wonderful two days.

Core Values Challenges

As mentioned in a previous post, the FLL core values are central to the competition experience. Succeeding in FLL isn’t necessarily about ‘winning’ – it is about learning, solving problems as a team, and having FUN!

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As part of the holiday workshops, the girls completed two core values challenges. The first, the “Towel Turn Over Challenge” (aka Magic Carpet), was a lot more difficult than anyone had anticipated. To complete the challenge, the girls had to stand on a beach towel, and turn it over without their hands or feet touching the floor. Sounds easy, doesn’t it?

To succeed in this challenge, the girls had to learn how to communicate effectively within their team. They had to stand back, discuss the problem, and ensure they listened to each other’s suggestions and strategies. The girls also had to develop their resilience and ability to learn from (repeated) failure. This wasn’t easy – although it was very entertaining to watch!

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The second team challenge was to design and build a bridge out of marshmallows and spaghetti. The idea was to create the longest bridge, but I think towers might be more challenging – we’ll try that next year. The marshmallows (and pasta) went down a treat 🙂

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Mission Programming

After spending several weeks working out which missions to focus on for this competition, these workshops provided the girls with their first dedicated opportunity to work on the programming and engineering for the robot game. The girls started by mapping out their algorithms – the sequence of steps required to solve the missions, and prototyping attachments.

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Starting our FLL Projects

As part of their preparation, the students need to identify a real world problem relating to the challenge theme, and come up with an innovative solution to that problem – which they present to the judges at the tournament.

This year, our theme is Animal Allies, and the project focuses on improving the interactions between humans and animals. After much discussion, brainstorming, and debate, the Year 5s have decided to focus on marine animals, and the Year 6s will focus on the dairy industry. As part of their research, the girls will need to seek the advice and expertise of experts in these fields – which we hope to do over the next two weeks.

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With less than six weeks to go before the tournament, we have a LOT of work to do! 

We’d like to thank Ms D (Year 5) for her help running these school holiday workshops; and we’d especially like to thank our parents, who helped provide a wonderful morning tea over the two days 🙂

Getting Started with FLL Animal Allies 2016

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Late last term, The Robotic Rebels (Year 5s) and The Motherboards (Year 6s) were busy preparing for the 2016 “Animal Allies” FIRST LEGO League season. We started by selecting team captains, and volunteering for team roles – engineering, programming, and project. After building the LEGO models, it (quite genuinely) took us three weeks to read the instructions, before brainstorming team mission strategies.

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During the mission strategy meetings, the girls ranked missions in order of difficulty and point values, and brainstormed the order in which they might attempt them. As part of this process, they mapped out possible robot navigation routes across the board.

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In pairs, students pitched their ideas to their team, and voted on the missions they will work on during the season. As the Year 6s will attest, this wasn’t an easy or straightforward process! They had to be guided into making their first compromise of the season over the animal feeding mission.

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An Introduction to FIRST LEGO League!

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Over the past few weeks, the girls have been exploring the requirements of the FIRST LEGO League competition, starting off with a practice run through the 2015 TrashTrek season.

The competition, which starts on September 1st, 2016, involves three key elements:

  1. Project: The students will need to research and design an innovative solution to a real world problem.
  2. Robot Game: The team needs to program and engineer solutions to a number of ‘missions’, earning points.
  3. Core Values: Through their presentations to judges, and demonstration of team identity during the robot game students are expected to uphold the FLL Core Values.

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The FLL Core Values are as follows: 

  • We are a team.
  • We do the work. Our coaches and mentors help us learn, but we find the answers ourselves.
  • We share our experiences and discoveries with others.
  • We are helpful, kind, and show respect when we work, play, and share. We call this Gracious Professionalism®.
  • We are all winners.
  • We have fun!

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Learning the Ropes of the Robot Game

The Robot Game is a major, and very complicated, component of the FLL competition. The game rules run to several thousand words and over 12 pages, and they are incredibly exact. During the course of the robot game, students need to try and compete a number of game missions, earning points. Placing in the top 40% of the robot game scores is a key requirement for qualification for the national FLL competition.

In FLL 2015 “TrashTrek”, the missions included transporting scientists (mini-figurines), removing plastic bags from the ocean environment, sorting trash, and extracting compost from a compost machine. Once the robot leaves the home base in the corner, it is on its own – which means the girls need to program and engineer their mission solutions. We will find out the 2016 Animal Allies missions in just over a week’s time!

The first step in the robot game preparation is the planning and strategy meeting. This involves careful reading and extensive discussions of the mission requirements and rules, identifying their point values and grading their level of difficulty (Easy, Medium, Too Hard). Then the girls need to identify which missions can be grouped together into a robot run, and vote on which missions they will attempt to solve for the season. That’s when the programming and building begin!

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Exploring Robot Design and Engineering

In the limited time we’ve had before the 2016 season starts in earnest, we have only briefly explored robot design & attachment engineering. We have been really grateful to many parents who have joined us during these sessions to learn more about the competition, and we look forward to their future visits and expert assistance during the Animal Allies season.

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Experimenting with a hook attachment

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A prototype sweeper attachment – possibly a little wide?

While this is our first year in this competition, I am now more confident that our girls have prepared well for this year’s challenge, and I am sure they will do themselves proud when they arrive at the WA FLL tournament in late November. With less than a week to go before Animal Allies begins, things are about to get interesting (and busy)!

Good luck girls!

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And just for fun …

It was seriously depressing how many of our robotics girls didn’t know what this little robot was :(. And to top it off, our Principal didn’t know either! The poor coach, and his fellow Whovian students, were very disappointed!